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9 Good Credit Cards With Little Or No Minimum Spend

I’m currently working on meeting the minimum spend on The Platinum Card®, and I’m still about a month away from hitting the $5,000 mark, after which I expect to get 60,000 American Express Membership Rewards points. The Amex Platinum has the highest minimum spend of any card I’ve applied for all year, and I specifically planned to apply toward the end of the year so holiday expenses could help me reach $5,000 in spend relatively quickly. Meanwhile, I’ve been considering what other cards I might want to apply for while I’m trying to meet the Amex’s minimum. It’d have to be a card that doesn’t have a large minimum spend requirement of its own. I’m sure others sometimes find themselves wondering how to juggle budgets with minimum spends, so here are a few decent options that might fit the bill (pun intended): JetBlue Plus Card I’ve been meaning to pick this card up for a while. The JetBlue Plus Card offers 30,000 TrueBlue points after $1,000 spend in the first 90 days. The card also has no foreign transaction fees and offers a 10% rebate on points every time you redeem them for a flight. It also is a “chip + pin” card, which makes it extra easy to use abroad. I’ve heard anecdotally that Barclaycard only lets you have two or three of their cards at once, so plan out whether you’d like this card, the AAdvantage Aviator card (see below), the Barclaycard Arrival Plus® World Elite Mastercard®, or one of their other cards. If you live in or near a city where JetBlue has a hub (like New York, Boston, Ft. Lauderdale, etc.), I’d definitely recommend applying for this card. It has a $99 annual fee, not waived the first year. You can redeem TrueBlue points for flights on JetBlue’s Mint business class IHG® Rewards Club Select Credit Card I already have this card, otherwise it’d be a no-brainer. Getting a free night at any IHG hotel worldwide every anniversary you have the card is a steal. The icing on the cake is the 60,000 bonus points after spending $1,000 in the first three months. Better yet, the annual fee is only $49, and it’s waived the first year. If you don’t already have this card, you should consider picking it up. Avianca Vuela Visa® Card The great thing about this card from Banco Popular is that there is no minimum spend – you get the 40,000 LifeMiles bonus after your first purchase. Also, many people report receiving a 60,000 bonus (instead of the advertised 40,000) when entering the code AVSPWE on the application. LifeMiles are one of the most lucrative points currencies for Star Alliance premium cabin redemptions. The annual fee is $149, not waived the first year. AAdvantage Aviator Red Card This card is just like the Vuela Visa in two ways: It has an alliterative name It requires no minimum spend: you get 60,000 bonus miles after you make your first purchase and pay the annual fee ($95) Sometimes it can be tricky to find a good redemption option for AAdvantage miles, but they certainly do

Can You Get Approved For Both The Chase Sapphire Preferred & Ink Business Preferred?

By my valuation of points, the two single best credit card sign-up bonuses available at the moment are on the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card and Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card. Not only do the cards offer huge sign-up bonuses and have reasonable annual fees, but they’re also rewarding for everyday spend, and offer great benefits. Why the Chase Sapphire Preferred is awesome The Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card has a sign-up bonus of 50,000 Ultimate Rewards points after spending $4,000 within three months, plus an additional 5,000 Ultimate Rewards points when you add an authorized user to the card that makes a purchase within three months. That’s a total of 55,000 Ultimate Rewards points, which I value at 1.7 cents each, or $935. That’s a massive sign-up bonus, and on top of that the card has the $95 annual fee waived for the first year. What makes this card so awesome otherwise? It offers double points on dining and travel It has no foreign transaction fees It gives you full access to Ultimate Rewards, meaning you can transfer your points to all the Ultimate Rewards airline and hotel partners It offers primary collision damage waiver coverage on car rentals To me this is one of the most well rounded cards with an annual fee of under $100 per year. Transfer Ultimate Rewards points to Hyatt and redeem at the Park Hyatt Maldives Why the Ink Business Preferred is awesome The Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card has an even bigger sign-up bonus than the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. It offers a sign-up bonus of 80,000 Ultimate Rewards points after spending $5,000 within three months. Given my valuation of 1.7 cents per Ultimate Rewards point, that makes the sign-up bonus worth a whopping $1,360. The card’s annual fee is also $95, though it isn’t waived for the first year But that’s only the beginning of the value of the card. In terms of the return on spend, the Ink Business Preferred Card offers triple points in the following categories: Travel Shipping purchases Internet, cable and phone services Advertising purchases made with social media sites and search engines You earn triple points on the first $150,000 spent in combined purchases in the above categories each account anniversary year (which means they’re not using a January 1 through December 31 calendar, but rather it’s based on when you signed up). Since I value Ultimate Rewards points at 1.7 cents each, that’s like earning a return of 5.1% on spend in those categories. That’s a massive return on spend. On top of that: It has no foreign transaction fees It gives you full access to Ultimate Rewards, meaning you can transfer your points to all the Ultimate Rewards airline and hotel transfer partners It offers primary collision damage waiver coverage on car rentals It has an amazing cell phone protection plan, which covers you for up to $600 of damage or theft to a cell phone Transfer Ultimate Rewards points to Singapore and redeem for the new Suites Can you apply for both cards? A few months ago Chase added restrictions when it comes to being approved for both the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card and Chase Sapphire Reserve℠ Card. The good news is that while both the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card and Ink Business Preferred Card are

Which Citi AAdvantage Card Offer Is Best For You?

We’re seeing one sign-up bonus on a Citi AAdvantage Card being pulled later today, while we just saw two new limited time sign-up bonuses being introduced yesterday, so I wanted to recap the offers for anyone who is trying to decide between these cards (since later today you’ll only have a total of two cards to choose from, rather than three). The three increased Citi AAdvantage Card sign-up bonuses At the moment there are three limited time sign-up bonuses on Citi AAdvantage cards. Here are the details of how big the offers are, their annual fees, and when the offers end: Limited time, ending later today: The Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard® is offering a sign-up bonus of 75,000 AAdvantage miles after making $7,500 of purchases within the first three months; the card has a $450 annual fee Limited time, just introduced: The Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard® is offering a sign-up bonus of 60,000 AAdvantage miles after making $3,000 of purchases within the first three months; the card has a $95 annual fee, which is waived for the first 12 months Limited time, just introduced: The CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Mastercard® is offering a sign-up bonus of 60,000 AAdvantage miles after making $3,000 of purchases within the first three months; the card has a $95 annual fee, which is waived for the first 12 months Which offers are you eligible for? As far as applying for Citi cards goes: You can only apply for one Citi card every eight days You can apply for no more than two Citi cards every 65 days In terms of eligibility for these cards specifically, both the Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard®  and Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard® have the following restrictions: American Airlines AAdvantage® bonus miles are not available if you have had any Citi® / AAdvantage®card (other than a CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® card) opened or closed in the past 24 months. Meanwhile the CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Mastercard® has the following restriction: This card is not available if the business already has a CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Mastercard® account. Bonus miles and any additional special offer not available if you have had any CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® account opened or closed in the past 24 months. In other words: If you have none of these cards, you can be approved for the CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Mastercard® and either the Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard®  or the Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard®, but not both If you have the Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard® and/or the Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard®, you’re eligible for the sign-up bonus on the CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Mastercard®  If you have the Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard®, you’re eligible for the sign-up bonus on the Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard® if you haven’t opened or closed either account in the past 24 months (however, if you’ve had the one card open for 24 or more months, you’d be eligible for the other one) If you have the Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard®, you’re eligible for the sign-up bonus on the Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive

Amex Business Cards That Won’t Count Towards The 5/24 Limit

One of the most restrictive policies for new credit card approvals is the 5/24 rule. Back in July I wrote a detailed explanation of how the restriction works, though let’s recap the basics first. What is the 5/24 rule? With Chase’s 5/24 policy, you typically won’t be approved for a card if you’ve opened five or more new accounts in the past 24 months. This is more of a general guideline than a strict rule, though. Here’s what you should know about 5/24: A vast majority of new credit card accounts will count towards that limit, meaning that opening five or more cards in 24 months will make you ineligible for certain Chase cards One exception is most non-Chase business cards don’t count towards this limit There are people who report not having any issues being approved for a card even though they surpassed the 5/24 rule, so it’s not consistently enforced The 5/24 rule doesn’t apply to all Chase cards, meaning that there are some Chase cards you can still easily be approved for if you’ve opened five or more card accounts in the past 24 months; among these cards is the IHG® Rewards Club Select Credit Card This is mostly anecdotal, since Chase doesn’t officially publish this restriction for most cards Amex Business Cards don’t count towards the 5/24 limit As I mentioned above, generally speaking non-Chase business cards don’t count towards the 5/24 limit. I tend to think that the best non-Chase business cards are those issued by American Express. Given the number of limited time American Express credit card offers available at the moment, I think it’s worth specifically talking about them in the context of this. Why does this matter? For those with excellent credit, Amex business cards are among the easiest to be approved for Amex typically uses internal data to conditionally approve people for their cards (which means applying for Amex cards is basically “risk free,” since there’s typically not a pull if you get denied) Typically there’s not even a hard pull when applying for an Amex business card Three great limited time Amex business card offers If you’re looking to apply for cards but don’t want to increase your “count” towards the 5/24 limit, consider applying for one of the following three limited time offers: The Gold Delta SkyMiles® Business Credit Card from American Express is offering 50,000 SkyMiles after spending $2,000 within three months, plus 10,000 additional SkyMiles after spending an additional $1,000 within the first six months, plus a $50 statement credit after making a Delta purchase within the first three months; the card has a $95 annual fee, which is waived for the first year (expires November 4, 2017) The Platinum Delta SkyMiles® Business Credit Card from American Express is offering 70,000 SkyMiles plus 10,000 Medallion Qualifying Miles after spending $4,000 within three months, plus a $100 statement credit after making a Delta purchase within the first three months; the card has a $195 annual fee (expires November 4, 2017) The Starwood Preferred Guest® Business Credit Card from American Express is offering 25,000 Starpoints after spending $6,000 within three months, plus 10,000 additional Starpoints after spending an additional $4,000 within the

8 Reasons The Chase Sapphire Preferred Is The Best Mid-Range Credit Card

The credit card industry is much more competitive now than it was several years ago, so it’s tougher to argue that there’s a single “best” credit card. Not only have sign-up bonuses increased significantly over the years, but so have bonus categories, as well as the ongoing perks offered by cards. One card that has been highly regarded for years is the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. Last year Chase introduced the Sapphire Reserve, which is a more premium version of the card. It’s a great card that competes well against The Platinum Card® from American Express and the Citi Prestige® Card. However, I’d argue that the Chase Sapphire Preferred continues to be the most well rounded mid-range credit card. When it comes to categorizing cards by annual fees, we have no annual fee cards, mid-range cards (with annual fees of ~$50-200), and then premium cards (with $200+ annual fee cards). What makes the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card the best mid-range credit card out there? A sign-up bonus of 50K+ points The Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card offers a sign-up bonus of 50,000 bonus Ultimate Rewards points after spending $4,000 on purchases within the first three months. On top of that, you can earn 5,000 additional bonus points if you add an authorized user and have them make a purchase within that same timeframe. So that’s a sign-up bonus of up to 55,000 bonus points, which I value at ~$935 (since I think Ultimate Rewards points are worth ~1.7 cents each). That’s the best sign-up bonus of any mid-range personal card. The first year’s annual fee waived While the card has a reasonable $95 annual fee, the annual fee is waived for the first 12 months. This is a great chance to try out the card before you have to actually “buy” it. No foreign transaction fees This might sound like a given, but there are quite a few cards with ~$100 annual fees that still have foreign transaction fees. For example, as much as I love The Amex EveryDay® Preferred Credit Card from American Express, it has a $95 annual fee and still has foreign transaction fees. 2x points on dining and travel The Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card offers double points on dining and travel, which I find to be among the most useful bonus categories out there. These bonus categories apply for purchases in the US and abroad (some other cards restrict bonus categories to US purchases), and Chase takes a pretty broad definition of those categories. “Travel” covers everything from flights to hotels to Ubers to parking to subway tickets. Even parking qualifies for 2x points with the Chase Sapphire Preferred Great travel & purchase protection Often great travel protection is reserved for premium cards, though the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card offers all kinds of great travel protection in the event your flight is delayed, your bags get lost, etc.: table#t199 border-collapse: collapse; border-width: 0px; border-style: outset; line-height: 2.0em; text-align: left; vertical-align: top;width: 100%;border-top: 1px solid #CCCCCC;border-right: 1px solid #FFFFFF;box-shadow: 0 0px 5px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4); table#t199 thead tr table#t199 thead tr th.t199 color: #FFFFFF; background: #16528E; background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #16528E 0%, #16528E 100%); background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left

My Hyatt Credit Card Conundrum

As I wrote about a few days ago, the sign-up bonus on The Hyatt Credit Card is changing as of Thursday, June 29, 2017. The sign-up bonus on the card is presently two free nights valid at any Hyatt property in the world after spending $2,000 on purchases within the first three months, plus 5,000 World of Hyatt points after adding an authorized user and having them make their first purchase within that same timeframe. As of June 29, 2017, the Hyatt Card’s new standard sign-up bonus will be 40,000 World of Hyatt bonus points after spending $2,000 on purchases within the first three months. Redeem your two free nights at the Park Hyatt Maldives Objectively the current bonus is much better, as Hyatt’s top properties go for 30,000 points per night. So assuming you’re able to redeem your certificates for one of Hyatt’s Category 6 or Category 7 properties, you’ll come out ahead under the current offer. I also shared seven reasons you should consider applying for The Hyatt Credit Card, especially given that this is one of the few Chase cards not subjected to the 5/24 rule, meaning you can be approved for the card even if you’ve opened more than five new accounts in the past 24 months. I’ve had The Hyatt Credit Card for years, and continue to hold onto it for the annual free night certificate and additional perks, which more than justify the annual fee, in my opinion. Ford has never had the card, so was going to sign-up for it, though I’m a bit conflicted about what to do. Like I said, the current bonus is objectively much better, though there’s one slight consideration — I’m a World of Hyatt Globalist member, and he isn’t. Why does that matter? Because if he redeems the two free night certificates then we won’t get Globalist benefits on the stay. However, if he waits until the new bonus is available, he’d get 40,000 points, could transfer those to me (which Hyatt allows for free), and we could redeem them with Globalist perks. Redeem your two free nights at the Park Hyatt New York So I guess the question comes down to whether we’d rather have two Category 7 nights as a non-Globalist, or 40,000 points in a Globalist account. Is anyone else in a similar situation? However, there’s one other consideration. All we know as of now is that the sign-up bonus is changing as of June 29. I don’t necessarily have a reason to believe anything else is changing, though I also don’t know. Is it possible that some other perk of the card is devalued? Maybe some more restrictions are added to the anniversary free night for new members? I don’t know. I have no inside info here, but there’s something to be said for taking advantage of a certain offer, over waiting for a new offer, and not knowing all the terms associated with it. Redeem your anniversary free night certificate at the Hyatt Olive 8 Seattle Bottom line There are just a couple of days left to take advantage of the excellent sign-up bonus

Amex Blue Business Plus Approval Without A Hard Pull?

Just a bit over a week ago, American Express introduced The Blue BusinessSM Plus Credit Card, which is one of the hottest new credit cards in the market. The card has no annual fee, accrues Membership Rewards points that can be transferred to airline and hotel partners, and most valuable of all, it offers 2x Membership Rewards points per dollar on the first $50,000 spent annually. On top of that, it’s offering a special sign-up bonus of 20,000 Membership Rewards points upon completing minimum spend. The way I see it, that makes this card the single most lucrative credit card for non-bonused spend. I’ve explained in a previous post why you should consider applying for the card, and also explained how you can apply for this card as a sole proprietorship, even if you don’t have a corporation. Anyway, there’s something interesting going on with Blue Business Plus Credit Card applications, which I first read about on Miles To Memories. As noted by Shawn, many people reported not having any sort of a credit pull when applying for this card. Shawn shared that was the case for him as well. I was curious about this, so just had a family member check their credit report to see if they had a hard pull, after getting instantly approved for the card. Sure enough, there was no hard pull. Very interesting. We’ve known that American Express often uses internal data to conditionally approve people (which means applying for Amex cards is basically “risk free,” since there’s typically not a pull if you get denied), but then there’s typically a formal credit pull. Many report that’s not happening here. Now, this certainly won’t be the case for everyone. I suspect it’s most likely that longstanding Amex customers, as well as those with several existing cards, are experiencing this most. Regardless, keep in mind that applications for Amex business cards don’t count towards Chase’s 5/24 rule, so you can apply for this card without impacting your chances of being approved for a Chase card in the future. To those who have already applied for the Blue Business Plus Credit Card, did you get a pull on your credit report? Source link

Review: The Hyatt Credit Card

There are lots of reasons to apply for credit cards. Some are worth getting for their great sign-up bonuses, others are worth getting for the return they offer on everyday spend, and others are worth getting for the great long term perks they offer. Some cards even excel in a couple or all of those categories. One of the all around best hotel credit cards is The Hyatt Credit Card, which is a card I’ve had had for years, and highly recommend. In this post I wanted to look at some of the benefits of the card in more details. Hyatt Credit Card sign-up bonus The Hyatt Credit Card offers a fantastic sign-up bonus, as follows: Two free nights at any Hyatt hotel in the world after spending $2,000 within three months 5,000 bonus points after you add an authorized user and they make a purchase within three months The two free Hyatt nights are really that straightforward. You can redeem them at any category Hyatt hotel, and as long as a standard room is available, you should be able to redeem them. This includes several hotels that often go for over $1,000 per night, like the Park Hyatt Maldives… …and Park Hyatt Sydney. World of Hyatt is transfer partners with Chase Ultimate Rewards, meaning you can transfer points earned on cards like the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card and Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card to extend your stay, if you’d like. Park Hyatt Maldives Hyatt Credit Card bonus eligibility The sign-up bonus on The Hyatt Credit Card is only available to those who don’t have this card, and those who have not received a new cardmember bonus for this card in the past 24 months. Furthermore, anecdotally this card isn’t subjected to Chase’s 5/24 rule, meaning that you should be eligible for the card even if you’ve opened more than five new card accounts in the past 24 moths. In other words, a lot of people should be eligible for this bonus. Hyatt Credit Card annual fee The annual fee on The Hyatt Credit Card is $75, and the fee isn’t waived for the first year. As a point of comparison to other hotel credit cards: The IHG® Rewards Club Select Credit Card has a $49 annual fee, though it’s waived the first year The Hilton Honors™ Surpass® Card from American Express has a $75 annual fee The Marriott Rewards® Premier Credit Card has an $85 annual fee The Starwood Preferred Guest® Credit Card from American Express has a $95 annual fee, though it’s waived the first year As you can see, the annual fee on the Hyatt Card is somewhere in the middle. Hyatt Credit Card return on spend The Hyatt Credit Card offers the following spend bonuses: 3x points per dollar spent at Hyatt hotels 2x points per dollar spent at restaurants, on airline tickets purchased directly from airlines, and on car rentals 1x point per dollar spent on everything else So the card has a decent rewards structure, though personally I wouldn’t put much spend on it, unless you’re going for Explorist status (as I’ll explain below). Keep in mind that Ultimate Rewards points can be converted into Hyatt points, and have bonus on earnings as well, while giving you more flexibility with your points: The Chase Sapphire Reserve℠

8 Reasons To Apply For The Best Ever Hilton Surpass Card Offer

The Hilton Honors™ Surpass® Card from American Express has the best ever sign-up bonus at the moment. It’s not often I get excited about Hilton credit card offers, but this one is especially lucrative. Ford applied for the card a bit ago, and I’d apply for it if I weren’t maxed out on Amex credit cards at the moment. Here are eight reasons to consider applying for the Hilton Surpass Card, which has a $75 annual fee: 100,000 points The most basic reason to get this card is that it offers a sign-up bonus of 100,000 points after spending $3,000 within three months. This is a limited time sign-up bonus, and is only available through May 31, 2017. 100,000 points is among the biggest bonuses we’ve seen on the card, so that in and of itself would make a great sign-up bonus for this product. A free weekend night But wait… there’s more! The card is also offering an additional bonus of a free weekend night on your card’s first account anniversary. The card only has a $75 annual fee, so that’s totally worth paying for the free night you get after your first year. This certificate can be used at a vast majority of Hilton family properties, including their most aspirational ones. Use your free weekend night at the Conrad London Gold status for as long as you have the card This is the lowest annual fee credit card that offers Hilton Gold status without any spend requirement. You receive Hilton Gold status for as long as you have the Hilton Surpass Card. This is one of the most useful mid-tier status levels out there, as it offers free breakfast, bonus points, room upgrades, and typically even even executive lounge access. For someone who makes occasional stays at Hiltons, this is a great status to have. Get free breakfast at Conrad hotels as a Gold member Diamond status if you spend $40,000 If you want to earn top tier status with Hilton, spending $40,000 on the card in a calendar year will do the trick. Obviously that’s a sizable amount of credit card spend, though at the same time that’s not too bad when you consider that you’re earning top tier status with a hotel chain. There’s no other hotel chain that gives you top tier status for such little spend. Hilton Diamond members are guaranteed executive lounge access Easy & risk free approval Anecdotally I find that this card is extremely easy to be approved for, so assuming you have decent credit, you shouldn’t have any trouble getting approved for this card. If you’re an existing cardmember and are denied for the card (which seems unlikely), it typically won’t count against your credit score. 25K additional bonus points per approval This is a really popular sign-up bonus, and the best part is that existing cardmembers can refer others to the Hilton Surpass Card. If you do, you’ll receive 25,000 Honors points per successful approval, up to a maximum of 80,000 bonus points per calendar year. If you don’t yet have the card, no worries. Once approved, you should be able to refer others to the card within days. The

How Amex’s Plan To Reduce Lounge Crowding May Actually Make It Worse

Earlier this month, American Express announced that the guest policy for their network of Centurion Lounges would be changing as of March 30th. Whereas Platinum members could previously bring in two guests or their immediate family, they’ll now only be allowed two guests, period. This is presumably being done to alleviate crowding, which can certainly be a problem at times. Yet it’s hard for me to believe that restricting families is really going to fix the issue. And in fact, I’m going to argue this silly policy is actually going to make things worse. I’ve had The Platinum Card® from American Express for a while now in part because my family gets pretty good value out of the lounges. One of the features we like most about the Amex Centurion lounges is that most of them have family rooms — dedicated places set aside to let the little ones be little. We’ve used the family rooms in the Houston, Dallas, and San Francisco clubs. Amex Centurion Lounge Houston family room But here’s the thing, we’re usually the only family in the space. I can’t remember a single time that we shared the San Francisco or Dallas family rooms with anyone. (To be fair, the one time we visited the lounge in Houston the family room was busy.) And I haven’t really observed many other families in the club outside the family room despite typically having an eye for these things. Ben’s experiences mostly matched mine, and has said he doesn’t expect this new policy to make much of a difference. Authorized users to the rescue The guesting policy allows each member to bring in two guests. So a family of three is fine, but a family of four, five, or six is not. But Amex has an interesting authorized user policy where you can add up to three authorized users on the personal version of the card for a flat $175 fee. And each authorized user gets full lounge access and guesting privileges. That means that if one parent has the card, they can add the other for a $175 fee. Then they’ll be able to bring in two guests, and their partner can bring in two more. Assuming they are traveling together as a family, they can now bring up to four kids with them into the lounge. Sure, the $175 fee seems a bit onerous and some might argue that it will discourage one spouse from adding the other. But it doesn’t take too many trips to the lounge instead of an airport restaurant to recoup the investment, particularly for those with bigger kids. Amex Centurion Lounge San Francisco family room Three authorized users for the price of one! The interesting thing about Amex’s policy is that it costs the same $175 to add one user as it does to add three. So if you’ve decided that adding your spouse makes sense, you might as well go ahead and add a grandparent as well so that when they are traveling they too can enjoy the lounge. But of course, many of us have two sets of grandparents (or more!)

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